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12/10/2016

The Jeweler Irene Neuwirth, Right at Home.

The Jeweler Irene Neuwirth, Right at Home.

The Jeweler Irene Neuwirth, Right at Home.

  WEST HOLLYWOOD, Calif. — What does a kitchen stove have to do with selling a $100,000 necklace? Everything if you are the jewelry designer Irene Neuwirth.

  

  Nestled between the Marni and Isabel Marant stores on the tony Melrose Place, Ms. Neuwirth’s first boutique is more than a retail space; it’s an invitation into her enviable lifestyle, complete with an in-store kitchen featuring the Rolls-Royce of stoves, a Lacanche, selected because the brass knobs on the French appliance reminded Ms. Neuwirth of her jewelry.

  

  “I just personally love entertaining so much, I thought, if I can’t do that in my dream store, what’s the point?” Ms. Neuwirth said.

  

  The designer’s casual take on fine jewelry — mixing bold rough-cut precious and semiprecious stones such as pink opal, turquoise, green chrysoprase and diamonds — have made her 13-year-old brand a top seller at Barneys New York, and a red carpet favorite with Julianne Moore, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Claire Danes, Elizabeth Banks and others.

  

  Ms. Neuwirth, 40, is one of a new generation of independent female jewelry designers giving Harry Winston and Cartier a run for their money by appealing to like-minded women who prize individuality and independence. She has been nominated for the Accessory Designer of the Year award, which the Council of Fashion Designers of America will announce on June 6, and in 2014, she won the CFDA Swarovski Award for Accessories. Her collection now is stocked by 20 retailers worldwide, including Barneys, the London-based retail chain MatchesFashion.com, Le Bon Marché in Paris and Holt Renfrew, the Canadian retail group.

  

  With her disarming grin and colorful fashion sense, Ms. Neuwirth also is a regular in the pages of glossy magazines such as Vogue and Elle, often featured in her home on the Venice, Calif., canals.

  

  “She’s a Venice bohemian to the nth degree,” said Simon Doonan, creative ambassador at large for Barneys New York, who recalled Ms. Neuwirth once arriving for a photo shoot at the store with her beloved Labradoodle Teddy decked out in her necklaces.

  

  Continue reading the main story

  

  RELATED COVERAGE

  

  interactive

  At Cannes, a Red Carpet Thrill MAY 11, 2016

  

  Haute Jewelry Is Hot MAY 11, 2016

  

  Cartier, Bulgari and Others Shun a Top Jewelry Showcase MAY 11, 2016

  Ruth Chapman, co-founder of MatchesFashion.com, wrote in an email: “She makes beautiful, wearable, modern jewelry in fabulous colors which appeal to collectors and more aspirational customers alike. The femininity and delicacy of her work give her global appeal.”

  

  Ms. Neuwirth opened her store at the end of 2014. “It was something I’ve always dreamt of, taking control of my branding and how people perceive my jewelry,” she said. “I felt really confident after being in business for 10 years that it wouldn’t be a fail, and that it would be a growing tool.”

  

  The 2,000-square-foot space — which Ms. Neuwirth designed in collaboration with Pam Shamshiri, who was with the Los Angeles design collective Commune at the time — has a feminine feel, in pale greens and pinks with brass accents and ethnic textiles adding contrast.

  

  “I remember walking past a jewelry store on Rodeo Drive a few years ago, and seeing guys outside on the sidewalk, wearing tuxedos and holding silver trays full of Champagne. It was so intimidating,” Ms. Neuwirth said. “That’s part of the traditional culture of fine jewelry I wanted to avoid.”

  

  At first, Ms. Shamshiri said, she was reticent about Ms. Neuwirth’s idea to put a kitchen in the store. “What about the smells?” she remembered thinking. “Then I went away a couple days and came back thinking, ‘She’s a genius.’ We went with a residential style for the whole place, and it makes the store feel like you are visiting Irene’s Paris apartment in L.A. She loves to entertain, is casual and intimate with people and in the way she wears jewelry, so it fits.”

  

  Like Ms. Neuwirth’s naturalistic creations of hand-carved opal flowers, labradorite leaves and rose cut moonstones, the store is a whimsical wonderland.

  

  The front walls are lined with animal portraits by the artist Claire Oswalt, including one of Teddy, the brand’s unofficial mascot. He is in the store most days, sitting at his owner’s feet as she lunches with friends or co-workers. And Ms. Neuwirth makes a modern twist on the cameo, using a pet’s photo to create a hand-painted charm, starting at $6,500. (Small gemstone pendants, which can be clustered on a chain, are the brand’s entry pieces, at about $400.)

  

  “I didn’t want jewelry to be the focus, but more of a discovery,” the designersaid of her vision for the space. Along another wall, Ms. Neuwirth’s sparklers are displayed in a magical diorama of flora and fauna crafted of cashmere, snakeskin and other organic materials by the artists Clare Crespo and Marine Panossian. Cabochon bracelets are draped across birds’ wings, and earrings dangle from vines. Other vitrines are filled with statement necklaces, such as a squash blossom-inspired piece that features an unusual mix of turquoise and ultrafine fire opals that would work as well with a T-shirt and jeans as with an evening gown.

  

  “All the rules in fine jewelry, I didn’t really know, so I don’t apply them,” Ms. Neuwirth said. “It’s that high low, precious, nonprecious mix. But I’m also very meticulous about how things are balanced and laid out. There is rhyme and reason.”

  

  The living room area is warm and inviting, with a plush pink velvet sofa and fireplace, a custom-made, brushed-silver hippo cocktail bar in the style of Lalanne, and bookshelves filled with stylish titles about the artist James Turrell and the photographer Richard Avedon. “It’s not unusual to have people come in, have a coffee, read or work on the pink couch,” Ms. Neuwirth said.

  

  And while the furniture and accessories are not for sale, “people try to buy them all the time.”

  

  In the kitchen, scalloped edges on custom cabinetry echo the shapes of Ms. Neuwirth’s rose gold teardrop earrings. Her modern take on the classic chandelier style was the bread and butter of her business early on, but now she says her biggest sellers are one-of-a-kind, $100,000-plus necklaces.

  

  A table with Gio Ponti chairs can seat 10, although Ms. Neuwirth pulls furniture out of the store so she can accommodate more guests for bigger parties. The Lacanche stove has been used by a number of L.A.’s top chefs, including Ludo Lefebvre (Trois Mec), Jon Shook and Vinny Dotolo (Animal) and Jessica Koslow (Sqirl), who cooked for a series of opening dinners last year. As the tequila flowed — Casa Dragones, the house favorite — no one jumped up and bought an opal necklace, but they did take off their shoes and dance, Ms. Neuwirth remembers.

  

  “I like the idea of creating brand awareness around everyday life, and not necessarily having to capitalize on it, but creating an image that in return helps sales of my jewelry,” she said.

  

  The actress Busy Philipps, a friend of Ms. Neuwirth’s, wrote in an email: “Anyone who has been to her store or followed her on Instagram or even just been in a room with Irene for five minutes wants to know how to emulate her style and her life.”

  

  Noting that she has built entire red carpet looks around Ms. Neuwirth’s one-of-a-kind pieces, Ms. Philipps added: “She does travel to fabulous places and she throws incredible parties, but there’s no pretense about it. She always surrounds herself with great friends ... and she incorporates great food and lots of color. Flowers everywhere, perfectly mismatched dishware, beautifully embroidered napkins she picked up in Mexico or wherever.”

  

  In October, Ms. Neuwirth invited 140 of her friends to her 40th birthday celebration in the colorful Mexican town of San Miguel de Allende. She rented the lavish Casa Hyder, the colonial-style estate with over-the-top lush decor, and planned every detail of the weekend’s festivities, from organizing a Day of the Dead parade through the town square, complete with strolling servers with shots of Casa Dragones, to hand-tying hundreds of paper flowers so they would fall just so from the top of the garden tent where dinner was served.

  

  Although she opted out of having media coverage of the event, which was attended by Ms. Philipps, Ms. Banks and a several other Hollywood types, she garnered publicity anyway, as she and her guests documented their experience in the small town on social media. “Not so much in sales, but I saw it translate into awareness in an unintentional way,” Ms. Neuwirth said.

  

  Ms. Neuwirth spent her childhood between Bel Air in Los Angeles, where her businessman father, Peter Neuwirth, lived, and the bohemian Venice canals, where her artist mother, Geraldine Neuwirth, made her home — and where the designer now lives with her boyfriend, the film director Phil Lord.

  

  After college, she retreated to Malibu to ride horses and figure out what she wanted to do with her life. She started experimenting with jewelry, stringing glass beads, and sent a few pieces unsolicited to Barneys New York. The store picked them up and she had a business.

  

  This summer, Ms. Neuwirth will take her entertaining skills to London, where Mr. Lord will be filming “Han Solo,” a “Star Wars” franchise spinoff, and she has rented a townhouse in Notting Hill.

  

  Expanding her international business will be a priority. “I don’t have a big plan like I have to be a $200 million brand next year,” she said. “I just want to continue on the path of becoming a forever brand.”

The Jeweler Irene Neuwirth, Right at Home.

  WEST HOLLYWOOD, Calif. — What does a kitchen stove have to do with selling a $100,000 necklace? Everything if you are the jewelry designer Irene Neuwirth.

  

  Nestled between the Marni and Isabel Marant stores on the tony Melrose Place, Ms. Neuwirth’s first boutique is more than a retail space; it’s an invitation into her enviable lifestyle, complete with an in-store kitchen featuring the Rolls-Royce of stoves, a Lacanche, selected because the brass knobs on the French appliance reminded Ms. Neuwirth of her jewelry.

  

  “I just personally love entertaining so much, I thought, if I can’t do that in my dream store, what’s the point?” Ms. Neuwirth said.

  

  The designer’s casual take on fine jewelry — mixing bold rough-cut precious and semiprecious stones such as pink opal, turquoise, green chrysoprase and diamonds — have made her 13-year-old brand a top seller at Barneys New York, and a red carpet favorite with Julianne Moore, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Claire Danes, Elizabeth Banks and others.

  

  Ms. Neuwirth, 40, is one of a new generation of independent female jewelry designers giving Harry Winston and Cartier a run for their money by appealing to like-minded women who prize individuality and independence. She has been nominated for the Accessory Designer of the Year award, which the Council of Fashion Designers of America will announce on June 6, and in 2014, she won the CFDA Swarovski Award for Accessories. Her collection now is stocked by 20 retailers worldwide, including Barneys, the London-based retail chain MatchesFashion.com, Le Bon Marché in Paris and Holt Renfrew, the Canadian retail group.

  

  With her disarming grin and colorful fashion sense, Ms. Neuwirth also is a regular in the pages of glossy magazines such as Vogue and Elle, often featured in her home on the Venice, Calif., canals.

  

  “She’s a Venice bohemian to the nth degree,” said Simon Doonan, creative ambassador at large for Barneys New York, who recalled Ms. Neuwirth once arriving for a photo shoot at the store with her beloved Labradoodle Teddy decked out in her necklaces.

  

  Continue reading the main story

  

  RELATED COVERAGE

  

  interactive

  At Cannes, a Red Carpet Thrill MAY 11, 2016

  

  Haute Jewelry Is Hot MAY 11, 2016

  

  Cartier, Bulgari and Others Shun a Top Jewelry Showcase MAY 11, 2016

  Ruth Chapman, co-founder of MatchesFashion.com, wrote in an email: “She makes beautiful, wearable, modern jewelry in fabulous colors which appeal to collectors and more aspirational customers alike. The femininity and delicacy of her work give her global appeal.”

  

  Ms. Neuwirth opened her store at the end of 2014. “It was something I’ve always dreamt of, taking control of my branding and how people perceive my jewelry,” she said. “I felt really confident after being in business for 10 years that it wouldn’t be a fail, and that it would be a growing tool.”

  

  The 2,000-square-foot space — which Ms. Neuwirth designed in collaboration with Pam Shamshiri, who was with the Los Angeles design collective Commune at the time — has a feminine feel, in pale greens and pinks with brass accents and ethnic textiles adding contrast.

  

  “I remember walking past a jewelry store on Rodeo Drive a few years ago, and seeing guys outside on the sidewalk, wearing tuxedos and holding silver trays full of Champagne. It was so intimidating,” Ms. Neuwirth said. “That’s part of the traditional culture of fine jewelry I wanted to avoid.”

  

  At first, Ms. Shamshiri said, she was reticent about Ms. Neuwirth’s idea to put a kitchen in the store. “What about the smells?” she remembered thinking. “Then I went away a couple days and came back thinking, ‘She’s a genius.’ We went with a residential style for the whole place, and it makes the store feel like you are visiting Irene’s Paris apartment in L.A. She loves to entertain, is casual and intimate with people and in the way she wears jewelry, so it fits.”

  

  Like Ms. Neuwirth’s naturalistic creations of hand-carved opal flowers, labradorite leaves and rose cut moonstones, the store is a whimsical wonderland.

  

  The front walls are lined with animal portraits by the artist Claire Oswalt, including one of Teddy, the brand’s unofficial mascot. He is in the store most days, sitting at his owner’s feet as she lunches with friends or co-workers. And Ms. Neuwirth makes a modern twist on the cameo, using a pet’s photo to create a hand-painted charm, starting at $6,500. (Small gemstone pendants, which can be clustered on a chain, are the brand’s entry pieces, at about $400.)

  

  “I didn’t want jewelry to be the focus, but more of a discovery,” the designersaid of her vision for the space. Along another wall, Ms. Neuwirth’s sparklers are displayed in a magical diorama of flora and fauna crafted of cashmere, snakeskin and other organic materials by the artists Clare Crespo and Marine Panossian. Cabochon bracelets are draped across birds’ wings, and earrings dangle from vines. Other vitrines are filled with statement necklaces, such as a squash blossom-inspired piece that features an unusual mix of turquoise and ultrafine fire opals that would work as well with a T-shirt and jeans as with an evening gown.

  

  “All the rules in fine jewelry, I didn’t really know, so I don’t apply them,” Ms. Neuwirth said. “It’s that high low, precious, nonprecious mix. But I’m also very meticulous about how things are balanced and laid out. There is rhyme and reason.”

  

  The living room area is warm and inviting, with a plush pink velvet sofa and fireplace, a custom-made, brushed-silver hippo cocktail bar in the style of Lalanne, and bookshelves filled with stylish titles about the artist James Turrell and the photographer Richard Avedon. “It’s not unusual to have people come in, have a coffee, read or work on the pink couch,” Ms. Neuwirth said.

  

  And while the furniture and accessories are not for sale, “people try to buy them all the time.”

  

  In the kitchen, scalloped edges on custom cabinetry echo the shapes of Ms. Neuwirth’s rose gold teardrop earrings. Her modern take on the classic chandelier style was the bread and butter of her business early on, but now she says her biggest sellers are one-of-a-kind, $100,000-plus necklaces.

  

  A table with Gio Ponti chairs can seat 10, although Ms. Neuwirth pulls furniture out of the store so she can accommodate more guests for bigger parties. The Lacanche stove has been used by a number of L.A.’s top chefs, including Ludo Lefebvre (Trois Mec), Jon Shook and Vinny Dotolo (Animal) and Jessica Koslow (Sqirl), who cooked for a series of opening dinners last year. As the tequila flowed — Casa Dragones, the house favorite — no one jumped up and bought an opal necklace, but they did take off their shoes and dance, Ms. Neuwirth remembers.

  

  “I like the idea of creating brand awareness around everyday life, and not necessarily having to capitalize on it, but creating an image that in return helps sales of my jewelry,” she said.

  

  The actress Busy Philipps, a friend of Ms. Neuwirth’s, wrote in an email: “Anyone who has been to her store or followed her on Instagram or even just been in a room with Irene for five minutes wants to know how to emulate her style and her life.”

  

  Noting that she has built entire red carpet looks around Ms. Neuwirth’s one-of-a-kind pieces, Ms. Philipps added: “She does travel to fabulous places and she throws incredible parties, but there’s no pretense about it. She always surrounds herself with great friends ... and she incorporates great food and lots of color. Flowers everywhere, perfectly mismatched dishware, beautifully embroidered napkins she picked up in Mexico or wherever.”

  

  In October, Ms. Neuwirth invited 140 of her friends to her 40th birthday celebration in the colorful Mexican town of San Miguel de Allende. She rented the lavish Casa Hyder, the colonial-style estate with over-the-top lush decor, and planned every detail of the weekend’s festivities, from organizing a Day of the Dead parade through the town square, complete with strolling servers with shots of Casa Dragones, to hand-tying hundreds of paper flowers so they would fall just so from the top of the garden tent where dinner was served.

  

  Although she opted out of having media coverage of the event, which was attended by Ms. Philipps, Ms. Banks and a several other Hollywood types, she garnered publicity anyway, as she and her guests documented their experience in the small town on social media. “Not so much in sales, but I saw it translate into awareness in an unintentional way,” Ms. Neuwirth said.

  

  Ms. Neuwirth spent her childhood between Bel Air in Los Angeles, where her businessman father, Peter Neuwirth, lived, and the bohemian Venice canals, where her artist mother, Geraldine Neuwirth, made her home — and where the designer now lives with her boyfriend, the film director Phil Lord.

  

  After college, she retreated to Malibu to ride horses and figure out what she wanted to do with her life. She started experimenting with jewelry, stringing glass beads, and sent a few pieces unsolicited to Barneys New York. The store picked them up and she had a business.

  

  This summer, Ms. Neuwirth will take her entertaining skills to London, where Mr. Lord will be filming “Han Solo,” a “Star Wars” franchise spinoff, and she has rented a townhouse in Notting Hill.

  

  Expanding her international business will be a priority. “I don’t have a big plan like I have to be a $200 million brand next year,” she said. “I just want to continue on the path of becoming a forever brand.”

The Jeweler Irene Neuwirth, Right at Home.

  WEST HOLLYWOOD, Calif. — What does a kitchen stove have to do with selling a $100,000 necklace? Everything if you are the jewelry designer Irene Neuwirth.

  

  Nestled between the Marni and Isabel Marant stores on the tony Melrose Place, Ms. Neuwirth’s first boutique is more than a retail space; it’s an invitation into her enviable lifestyle, complete with an in-store kitchen featuring the Rolls-Royce of stoves, a Lacanche, selected because the brass knobs on the French appliance reminded Ms. Neuwirth of her jewelry.

  

  “I just personally love entertaining so much, I thought, if I can’t do that in my dream store, what’s the point?” Ms. Neuwirth said.

  

  The designer’s casual take on fine jewelry — mixing bold rough-cut precious and semiprecious stones such as pink opal, turquoise, green chrysoprase and diamonds — have made her 13-year-old brand a top seller at Barneys New York, and a red carpet favorite with Julianne Moore, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Claire Danes, Elizabeth Banks and others.

  

  Ms. Neuwirth, 40, is one of a new generation of independent female jewelry designers giving Harry Winston and Cartier a run for their money by appealing to like-minded women who prize individuality and independence. She has been nominated for the Accessory Designer of the Year award, which the Council of Fashion Designers of America will announce on June 6, and in 2014, she won the CFDA Swarovski Award for Accessories. Her collection now is stocked by 20 retailers worldwide, including Barneys, the London-based retail chain MatchesFashion.com, Le Bon Marché in Paris and Holt Renfrew, the Canadian retail group.

  

  With her disarming grin and colorful fashion sense, Ms. Neuwirth also is a regular in the pages of glossy magazines such as Vogue and Elle, often featured in her home on the Venice, Calif., canals.

  

  “She’s a Venice bohemian to the nth degree,” said Simon Doonan, creative ambassador at large for Barneys New York, who recalled Ms. Neuwirth once arriving for a photo shoot at the store with her beloved Labradoodle Teddy decked out in her necklaces.

  

  Continue reading the main story

  

  RELATED COVERAGE

  

  interactive

  At Cannes, a Red Carpet Thrill MAY 11, 2016

  

  Haute Jewelry Is Hot MAY 11, 2016

  

  Cartier, Bulgari and Others Shun a Top Jewelry Showcase MAY 11, 2016

  Ruth Chapman, co-founder of MatchesFashion.com, wrote in an email: “She makes beautiful, wearable, modern jewelry in fabulous colors which appeal to collectors and more aspirational customers alike. The femininity and delicacy of her work give her global appeal.”

  

  Ms. Neuwirth opened her store at the end of 2014. “It was something I’ve always dreamt of, taking control of my branding and how people perceive my jewelry,” she said. “I felt really confident after being in business for 10 years that it wouldn’t be a fail, and that it would be a growing tool.”

  

  The 2,000-square-foot space — which Ms. Neuwirth designed in collaboration with Pam Shamshiri, who was with the Los Angeles design collective Commune at the time — has a feminine feel, in pale greens and pinks with brass accents and ethnic textiles adding contrast.

  

  “I remember walking past a jewelry store on Rodeo Drive a few years ago, and seeing guys outside on the sidewalk, wearing tuxedos and holding silver trays full of Champagne. It was so intimidating,” Ms. Neuwirth said. “That’s part of the traditional culture of fine jewelry I wanted to avoid.”

  

  At first, Ms. Shamshiri said, she was reticent about Ms. Neuwirth’s idea to put a kitchen in the store. “What about the smells?” she remembered thinking. “Then I went away a couple days and came back thinking, ‘She’s a genius.’ We went with a residential style for the whole place, and it makes the store feel like you are visiting Irene’s Paris apartment in L.A. She loves to entertain, is casual and intimate with people and in the way she wears jewelry, so it fits.”

  

  Like Ms. Neuwirth’s naturalistic creations of hand-carved opal flowers, labradorite leaves and rose cut moonstones, the store is a whimsical wonderland.

  

  The front walls are lined with animal portraits by the artist Claire Oswalt, including one of Teddy, the brand’s unofficial mascot. He is in the store most days, sitting at his owner’s feet as she lunches with friends or co-workers. And Ms. Neuwirth makes a modern twist on the cameo, using a pet’s photo to create a hand-painted charm, starting at $6,500. (Small gemstone pendants, which can be clustered on a chain, are the brand’s entry pieces, at about $400.)

  

  “I didn’t want jewelry to be the focus, but more of a discovery,” the designersaid of her vision for the space. Along another wall, Ms. Neuwirth’s sparklers are displayed in a magical diorama of flora and fauna crafted of cashmere, snakeskin and other organic materials by the artists Clare Crespo and Marine Panossian. Cabochon bracelets are draped across birds’ wings, and earrings dangle from vines. Other vitrines are filled with statement necklaces, such as a squash blossom-inspired piece that features an unusual mix of turquoise and ultrafine fire opals that would work as well with a T-shirt and jeans as with an evening gown.

  

  “All the rules in fine jewelry, I didn’t really know, so I don’t apply them,” Ms. Neuwirth said. “It’s that high low, precious, nonprecious mix. But I’m also very meticulous about how things are balanced and laid out. There is rhyme and reason.”

  

  The living room area is warm and inviting, with a plush pink velvet sofa and fireplace, a custom-made, brushed-silver hippo cocktail bar in the style of Lalanne, and bookshelves filled with stylish titles about the artist James Turrell and the photographer Richard Avedon. “It’s not unusual to have people come in, have a coffee, read or work on the pink couch,” Ms. Neuwirth said.

  

  And while the furniture and accessories are not for sale, “people try to buy them all the time.”

  

  In the kitchen, scalloped edges on custom cabinetry echo the shapes of Ms. Neuwirth’s rose gold teardrop earrings. Her modern take on the classic chandelier style was the bread and butter of her business early on, but now she says her biggest sellers are one-of-a-kind, $100,000-plus necklaces.

  

  A table with Gio Ponti chairs can seat 10, although Ms. Neuwirth pulls furniture out of the store so she can accommodate more guests for bigger parties. The Lacanche stove has been used by a number of L.A.’s top chefs, including Ludo Lefebvre (Trois Mec), Jon Shook and Vinny Dotolo (Animal) and Jessica Koslow (Sqirl), who cooked for a series of opening dinners last year. As the tequila flowed — Casa Dragones, the house favorite — no one jumped up and bought an opal necklace, but they did take off their shoes and dance, Ms. Neuwirth remembers.

  

  “I like the idea of creating brand awareness around everyday life, and not necessarily having to capitalize on it, but creating an image that in return helps sales of my jewelry,” she said.

  

  The actress Busy Philipps, a friend of Ms. Neuwirth’s, wrote in an email: “Anyone who has been to her store or followed her on Instagram or even just been in a room with Irene for five minutes wants to know how to emulate her style and her life.”

  

  Noting that she has built entire red carpet looks around Ms. Neuwirth’s one-of-a-kind pieces, Ms. Philipps added: “She does travel to fabulous places and she throws incredible parties, but there’s no pretense about it. She always surrounds herself with great friends ... and she incorporates great food and lots of color. Flowers everywhere, perfectly mismatched dishware, beautifully embroidered napkins she picked up in Mexico or wherever.”

  

  In October, Ms. Neuwirth invited 140 of her friends to her 40th birthday celebration in the colorful Mexican town of San Miguel de Allende. She rented the lavish Casa Hyder, the colonial-style estate with over-the-top lush decor, and planned every detail of the weekend’s festivities, from organizing a Day of the Dead parade through the town square, complete with strolling servers with shots of Casa Dragones, to hand-tying hundreds of paper flowers so they would fall just so from the top of the garden tent where dinner was served.

  

  Although she opted out of having media coverage of the event, which was attended by Ms. Philipps, Ms. Banks and a several other Hollywood types, she garnered publicity anyway, as she and her guests documented their experience in the small town on social media. “Not so much in sales, but I saw it translate into awareness in an unintentional way,” Ms. Neuwirth said.

  

  Ms. Neuwirth spent her childhood between Bel Air in Los Angeles, where her businessman father, Peter Neuwirth, lived, and the bohemian Venice canals, where her artist mother, Geraldine Neuwirth, made her home — and where the designer now lives with her boyfriend, the film director Phil Lord.

  

  After college, she retreated to Malibu to ride horses and figure out what she wanted to do with her life. She started experimenting with jewelry, stringing glass beads, and sent a few pieces unsolicited to Barneys New York. The store picked them up and she had a business.

  

  This summer, Ms. Neuwirth will take her entertaining skills to London, where Mr. Lord will be filming “Han Solo,” a “Star Wars” franchise spinoff, and she has rented a townhouse in Notting Hill.

  

  Expanding her international business will be a priority. “I don’t have a big plan like I have to be a $200 million brand next year,” she said. “I just want to continue on the path of becoming a forever brand.”

The Jeweler Irene Neuwirth, Right at Home.

  WEST HOLLYWOOD, Calif. — What does a kitchen stove have to do with selling a $100,000 necklace? Everything if you are the jewelry designer Irene Neuwirth.

  

  Nestled between the Marni and Isabel Marant stores on the tony Melrose Place, Ms. Neuwirth’s first boutique is more than a retail space; it’s an invitation into her enviable lifestyle, complete with an in-store kitchen featuring the Rolls-Royce of stoves, a Lacanche, selected because the brass knobs on the French appliance reminded Ms. Neuwirth of her jewelry.

  

  “I just personally love entertaining so much, I thought, if I can’t do that in my dream store, what’s the point?” Ms. Neuwirth said.

  

  The designer’s casual take on fine jewelry — mixing bold rough-cut precious and semiprecious stones such as pink opal, turquoise, green chrysoprase and diamonds — have made her 13-year-old brand a top seller at Barneys New York, and a red carpet favorite with Julianne Moore, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Claire Danes, Elizabeth Banks and others.

  

  Ms. Neuwirth, 40, is one of a new generation of independent female jewelry designers giving Harry Winston and Cartier a run for their money by appealing to like-minded women who prize individuality and independence. She has been nominated for the Accessory Designer of the Year award, which the Council of Fashion Designers of America will announce on June 6, and in 2014, she won the CFDA Swarovski Award for Accessories. Her collection now is stocked by 20 retailers worldwide, including Barneys, the London-based retail chain MatchesFashion.com, Le Bon Marché in Paris and Holt Renfrew, the Canadian retail group.

  

  With her disarming grin and colorful fashion sense, Ms. Neuwirth also is a regular in the pages of glossy magazines such as Vogue and Elle, often featured in her home on the Venice, Calif., canals.

  

  “She’s a Venice bohemian to the nth degree,” said Simon Doonan, creative ambassador at large for Barneys New York, who recalled Ms. Neuwirth once arriving for a photo shoot at the store with her beloved Labradoodle Teddy decked out in her necklaces.

  

  Continue reading the main story

  

  RELATED COVERAGE

  

  interactive

  At Cannes, a Red Carpet Thrill MAY 11, 2016

  

  Haute Jewelry Is Hot MAY 11, 2016

  

  Cartier, Bulgari and Others Shun a Top Jewelry Showcase MAY 11, 2016

  Ruth Chapman, co-founder of MatchesFashion.com, wrote in an email: “She makes beautiful, wearable, modern jewelry in fabulous colors which appeal to collectors and more aspirational customers alike. The femininity and delicacy of her work give her global appeal.”

  

  Ms. Neuwirth opened her store at the end of 2014. “It was something I’ve always dreamt of, taking control of my branding and how people perceive my jewelry,” she said. “I felt really confident after being in business for 10 years that it wouldn’t be a fail, and that it would be a growing tool.”

  

  The 2,000-square-foot space — which Ms. Neuwirth designed in collaboration with Pam Shamshiri, who was with the Los Angeles design collective Commune at the time — has a feminine feel, in pale greens and pinks with brass accents and ethnic textiles adding contrast.

  

  “I remember walking past a jewelry store on Rodeo Drive a few years ago, and seeing guys outside on the sidewalk, wearing tuxedos and holding silver trays full of Champagne. It was so intimidating,” Ms. Neuwirth said. “That’s part of the traditional culture of fine jewelry I wanted to avoid.”

  

  At first, Ms. Shamshiri said, she was reticent about Ms. Neuwirth’s idea to put a kitchen in the store. “What about the smells?” she remembered thinking. “Then I went away a couple days and came back thinking, ‘She’s a genius.’ We went with a residential style for the whole place, and it makes the store feel like you are visiting Irene’s Paris apartment in L.A. She loves to entertain, is casual and intimate with people and in the way she wears jewelry, so it fits.”

  

  Like Ms. Neuwirth’s naturalistic creations of hand-carved opal flowers, labradorite leaves and rose cut moonstones, the store is a whimsical wonderland.

  

  The front walls are lined with animal portraits by the artist Claire Oswalt, including one of Teddy, the brand’s unofficial mascot. He is in the store most days, sitting at his owner’s feet as she lunches with friends or co-workers. And Ms. Neuwirth makes a modern twist on the cameo, using a pet’s photo to create a hand-painted charm, starting at $6,500. (Small gemstone pendants, which can be clustered on a chain, are the brand’s entry pieces, at about $400.)

  

  “I didn’t want jewelry to be the focus, but more of a discovery,” the designersaid of her vision for the space. Along another wall, Ms. Neuwirth’s sparklers are displayed in a magical diorama of flora and fauna crafted of cashmere, snakeskin and other organic materials by the artists Clare Crespo and Marine Panossian. Cabochon bracelets are draped across birds’ wings, and earrings dangle from vines. Other vitrines are filled with statement necklaces, such as a squash blossom-inspired piece that features an unusual mix of turquoise and ultrafine fire opals that would work as well with a T-shirt and jeans as with an evening gown.

  

  “All the rules in fine jewelry, I didn’t really know, so I don’t apply them,” Ms. Neuwirth said. “It’s that high low, precious, nonprecious mix. But I’m also very meticulous about how things are balanced and laid out. There is rhyme and reason.”

  

  The living room area is warm and inviting, with a plush pink velvet sofa and fireplace, a custom-made, brushed-silver hippo cocktail bar in the style of Lalanne, and bookshelves filled with stylish titles about the artist James Turrell and the photographer Richard Avedon. “It’s not unusual to have people come in, have a coffee, read or work on the pink couch,” Ms. Neuwirth said.

  

  And while the furniture and accessories are not for sale, “people try to buy them all the time.”

  

  In the kitchen, scalloped edges on custom cabinetry echo the shapes of Ms. Neuwirth’s rose gold teardrop earrings. Her modern take on the classic chandelier style was the bread and butter of her business early on, but now she says her biggest sellers are one-of-a-kind, $100,000-plus necklaces.

  

  A table with Gio Ponti chairs can seat 10, although Ms. Neuwirth pulls furniture out of the store so she can accommodate more guests for bigger parties. The Lacanche stove has been used by a number of L.A.’s top chefs, including Ludo Lefebvre (Trois Mec), Jon Shook and Vinny Dotolo (Animal) and Jessica Koslow (Sqirl), who cooked for a series of opening dinners last year. As the tequila flowed — Casa Dragones, the house favorite — no one jumped up and bought an opal necklace, but they did take off their shoes and dance, Ms. Neuwirth remembers.

  

  “I like the idea of creating brand awareness around everyday life, and not necessarily having to capitalize on it, but creating an image that in return helps sales of my jewelry,” she said.

  

  The actress Busy Philipps, a friend of Ms. Neuwirth’s, wrote in an email: “Anyone who has been to her store or followed her on Instagram or even just been in a room with Irene for five minutes wants to know how to emulate her style and her life.”

  

  Noting that she has built entire red carpet looks around Ms. Neuwirth’s one-of-a-kind pieces, Ms. Philipps added: “She does travel to fabulous places and she throws incredible parties, but there’s no pretense about it. She always surrounds herself with great friends ... and she incorporates great food and lots of color. Flowers everywhere, perfectly mismatched dishware, beautifully embroidered napkins she picked up in Mexico or wherever.”

  

  In October, Ms. Neuwirth invited 140 of her friends to her 40th birthday celebration in the colorful Mexican town of San Miguel de Allende. She rented the lavish Casa Hyder, the colonial-style estate with over-the-top lush decor, and planned every detail of the weekend’s festivities, from organizing a Day of the Dead parade through the town square, complete with strolling servers with shots of Casa Dragones, to hand-tying hundreds of paper flowers so they would fall just so from the top of the garden tent where dinner was served.

  

  Although she opted out of having media coverage of the event, which was attended by Ms. Philipps, Ms. Banks and a several other Hollywood types, she garnered publicity anyway, as she and her guests documented their experience in the small town on social media. “Not so much in sales, but I saw it translate into awareness in an unintentional way,” Ms. Neuwirth said.

  

  Ms. Neuwirth spent her childhood between Bel Air in Los Angeles, where her businessman father, Peter Neuwirth, lived, and the bohemian Venice canals, where her artist mother, Geraldine Neuwirth, made her home — and where the designer now lives with her boyfriend, the film director Phil Lord.

  

  After college, she retreated to Malibu to ride horses and figure out what she wanted to do with her life. She started experimenting with jewelry, stringing glass beads, and sent a few pieces unsolicited to Barneys New York. The store picked them up and she had a business.

  

  This summer, Ms. Neuwirth will take her entertaining skills to London, where Mr. Lord will be filming “Han Solo,” a “Star Wars” franchise spinoff, and she has rented a townhouse in Notting Hill.

  

  Expanding her international business will be a priority. “I don’t have a big plan like I have to be a $200 million brand next year,” she said. “I just want to continue on the path of becoming a forever brand.”

The Jeweler Irene Neuwirth, Right at Home.

  WEST HOLLYWOOD, Calif. — What does a kitchen stove have to do with selling a $100,000 necklace? Everything if you are the jewelry designer Irene Neuwirth.

  

  Nestled between the Marni and Isabel Marant stores on the tony Melrose Place, Ms. Neuwirth’s first boutique is more than a retail space; it’s an invitation into her enviable lifestyle, complete with an in-store kitchen featuring the Rolls-Royce of stoves, a Lacanche, selected because the brass knobs on the French appliance reminded Ms. Neuwirth of her jewelry.

  

  “I just personally love entertaining so much, I thought, if I can’t do that in my dream store, what’s the point?” Ms. Neuwirth said.

  

  The designer’s casual take on fine jewelry — mixing bold rough-cut precious and semiprecious stones such as pink opal, turquoise, green chrysoprase and diamonds — have made her 13-year-old brand a top seller at Barneys New York, and a red carpet favorite with Julianne Moore, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Claire Danes, Elizabeth Banks and others.

  

  Ms. Neuwirth, 40, is one of a new generation of independent female jewelry designers giving Harry Winston and Cartier a run for their money by appealing to like-minded women who prize individuality and independence. She has been nominated for the Accessory Designer of the Year award, which the Council of Fashion Designers of America will announce on June 6, and in 2014, she won the CFDA Swarovski Award for Accessories. Her collection now is stocked by 20 retailers worldwide, including Barneys, the London-based retail chain MatchesFashion.com, Le Bon Marché in Paris and Holt Renfrew, the Canadian retail group.

  

  With her disarming grin and colorful fashion sense, Ms. Neuwirth also is a regular in the pages of glossy magazines such as Vogue and Elle, often featured in her home on the Venice, Calif., canals.

  

  “She’s a Venice bohemian to the nth degree,” said Simon Doonan, creative ambassador at large for Barneys New York, who recalled Ms. Neuwirth once arriving for a photo shoot at the store with her beloved Labradoodle Teddy decked out in her necklaces.

  

  Continue reading the main story

  

  RELATED COVERAGE

  

  interactive

  At Cannes, a Red Carpet Thrill MAY 11, 2016

  

  Haute Jewelry Is Hot MAY 11, 2016

  

  Cartier, Bulgari and Others Shun a Top Jewelry Showcase MAY 11, 2016

  Ruth Chapman, co-founder of MatchesFashion.com, wrote in an email: “She makes beautiful, wearable, modern jewelry in fabulous colors which appeal to collectors and more aspirational customers alike. The femininity and delicacy of her work give her global appeal.”

  

  Ms. Neuwirth opened her store at the end of 2014. “It was something I’ve always dreamt of, taking control of my branding and how people perceive my jewelry,” she said. “I felt really confident after being in business for 10 years that it wouldn’t be a fail, and that it would be a growing tool.”

  

  The 2,000-square-foot space — which Ms. Neuwirth designed in collaboration with Pam Shamshiri, who was with the Los Angeles design collective Commune at the time — has a feminine feel, in pale greens and pinks with brass accents and ethnic textiles adding contrast.

  

  “I remember walking past a jewelry store on Rodeo Drive a few years ago, and seeing guys outside on the sidewalk, wearing tuxedos and holding silver trays full of Champagne. It was so intimidating,” Ms. Neuwirth said. “That’s part of the traditional culture of fine jewelry I wanted to avoid.”

  

  At first, Ms. Shamshiri said, she was reticent about Ms. Neuwirth’s idea to put a kitchen in the store. “What about the smells?” she remembered thinking. “Then I went away a couple days and came back thinking, ‘She’s a genius.’ We went with a residential style for the whole place, and it makes the store feel like you are visiting Irene’s Paris apartment in L.A. She loves to entertain, is casual and intimate with people and in the way she wears jewelry, so it fits.”

  

  Like Ms. Neuwirth’s naturalistic creations of hand-carved opal flowers, labradorite leaves and rose cut moonstones, the store is a whimsical wonderland.

  

  The front walls are lined with animal portraits by the artist Claire Oswalt, including one of Teddy, the brand’s unofficial mascot. He is in the store most days, sitting at his owner’s feet as she lunches with friends or co-workers. And Ms. Neuwirth makes a modern twist on the cameo, using a pet’s photo to create a hand-painted charm, starting at $6,500. (Small gemstone pendants, which can be clustered on a chain, are the brand’s entry pieces, at about $400.)

  

  “I didn’t want jewelry to be the focus, but more of a discovery,” the designersaid of her vision for the space. Along another wall, Ms. Neuwirth’s sparklers are displayed in a magical diorama of flora and fauna crafted of cashmere, snakeskin and other organic materials by the artists Clare Crespo and Marine Panossian. Cabochon bracelets are draped across birds’ wings, and earrings dangle from vines. Other vitrines are filled with statement necklaces, such as a squash blossom-inspired piece that features an unusual mix of turquoise and ultrafine fire opals that would work as well with a T-shirt and jeans as with an evening gown.

  

  “All the rules in fine jewelry, I didn’t really know, so I don’t apply them,” Ms. Neuwirth said. “It’s that high low, precious, nonprecious mix. But I’m also very meticulous about how things are balanced and laid out. There is rhyme and reason.”

  

  The living room area is warm and inviting, with a plush pink velvet sofa and fireplace, a custom-made, brushed-silver hippo cocktail bar in the style of Lalanne, and bookshelves filled with stylish titles about the artist James Turrell and the photographer Richard Avedon. “It’s not unusual to have people come in, have a coffee, read or work on the pink couch,” Ms. Neuwirth said.

  

  And while the furniture and accessories are not for sale, “people try to buy them all the time.”

  

  In the kitchen, scalloped edges on custom cabinetry echo the shapes of Ms. Neuwirth’s rose gold teardrop earrings. Her modern take on the classic chandelier style was the bread and butter of her business early on, but now she says her biggest sellers are one-of-a-kind, $100,000-plus necklaces.

  

  A table with Gio Ponti chairs can seat 10, although Ms. Neuwirth pulls furniture out of the store so she can accommodate more guests for bigger parties. The Lacanche stove has been used by a number of L.A.’s top chefs, including Ludo Lefebvre (Trois Mec), Jon Shook and Vinny Dotolo (Animal) and Jessica Koslow (Sqirl), who cooked for a series of opening dinners last year. As the tequila flowed — Casa Dragones, the house favorite — no one jumped up and bought an opal necklace, but they did take off their shoes and dance, Ms. Neuwirth remembers.

  

  “I like the idea of creating brand awareness around everyday life, and not necessarily having to capitalize on it, but creating an image that in return helps sales of my jewelry,” she said.

  

  The actress Busy Philipps, a friend of Ms. Neuwirth’s, wrote in an email: “Anyone who has been to her store or followed her on Instagram or even just been in a room with Irene for five minutes wants to know how to emulate her style and her life.”

  

  Noting that she has built entire red carpet looks around Ms. Neuwirth’s one-of-a-kind pieces, Ms. Philipps added: “She does travel to fabulous places and she throws incredible parties, but there’s no pretense about it. She always surrounds herself with great friends ... and she incorporates great food and lots of color. Flowers everywhere, perfectly mismatched dishware, beautifully embroidered napkins she picked up in Mexico or wherever.”

  

  In October, Ms. Neuwirth invited 140 of her friends to her 40th birthday celebration in the colorful Mexican town of San Miguel de Allende. She rented the lavish Casa Hyder, the colonial-style estate with over-the-top lush decor, and planned every detail of the weekend’s festivities, from organizing a Day of the Dead parade through the town square, complete with strolling servers with shots of Casa Dragones, to hand-tying hundreds of paper flowers so they would fall just so from the top of the garden tent where dinner was served.

  

  Although she opted out of having media coverage of the event, which was attended by Ms. Philipps, Ms. Banks and a several other Hollywood types, she garnered publicity anyway, as she and her guests documented their experience in the small town on social media. “Not so much in sales, but I saw it translate into awareness in an unintentional way,” Ms. Neuwirth said.

  

  Ms. Neuwirth spent her childhood between Bel Air in Los Angeles, where her businessman father, Peter Neuwirth, lived, and the bohemian Venice canals, where her artist mother, Geraldine Neuwirth, made her home — and where the designer now lives with her boyfriend, the film director Phil Lord.

  

  After college, she retreated to Malibu to ride horses and figure out what she wanted to do with her life. She started experimenting with jewelry, stringing glass beads, and sent a few pieces unsolicited to Barneys New York. The store picked them up and she had a business.

  

  This summer, Ms. Neuwirth will take her entertaining skills to London, where Mr. Lord will be filming “Han Solo,” a “Star Wars” franchise spinoff, and she has rented a townhouse in Notting Hill.

  

  Expanding her international business will be a priority. “I don’t have a big plan like I have to be a $200 million brand next year,” she said. “I just want to continue on the path of becoming a forever brand.”

The Jeweler Irene Neuwirth, Right at Home.

  WEST HOLLYWOOD, Calif. — What does a kitchen stove have to do with selling a $100,000 necklace? Everything if you are the jewelry designer Irene Neuwirth.

  

  Nestled between the Marni and Isabel Marant stores on the tony Melrose Place, Ms. Neuwirth’s first boutique is more than a retail space; it’s an invitation into her enviable lifestyle, complete with an in-store kitchen featuring the Rolls-Royce of stoves, a Lacanche, selected because the brass knobs on the French appliance reminded Ms. Neuwirth of her jewelry.

  

  “I just personally love entertaining so much, I thought, if I can’t do that in my dream store, what’s the point?” Ms. Neuwirth said.

  

  The designer’s casual take on fine jewelry — mixing bold rough-cut precious and semiprecious stones such as pink opal, turquoise, green chrysoprase and diamonds — have made her 13-year-old brand a top seller at Barneys New York, and a red carpet favorite with Julianne Moore, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Claire Danes, Elizabeth Banks and others.

  

  Ms. Neuwirth, 40, is one of a new generation of independent female jewelry designers giving Harry Winston and Cartier a run for their money by appealing to like-minded women who prize individuality and independence. She has been nominated for the Accessory Designer of the Year award, which the Council of Fashion Designers of America will announce on June 6, and in 2014, she won the CFDA Swarovski Award for Accessories. Her collection now is stocked by 20 retailers worldwide, including Barneys, the London-based retail chain MatchesFashion.com, Le Bon Marché in Paris and Holt Renfrew, the Canadian retail group.

  

  With her disarming grin and colorful fashion sense, Ms. Neuwirth also is a regular in the pages of glossy magazines such as Vogue and Elle, often featured in her home on the Venice, Calif., canals.

  

  “She’s a Venice bohemian to the nth degree,” said Simon Doonan, creative ambassador at large for Barneys New York, who recalled Ms. Neuwirth once arriving for a photo shoot at the store with her beloved Labradoodle Teddy decked out in her necklaces.

  

  Continue reading the main story

  

  RELATED COVERAGE

  

  interactive

  At Cannes, a Red Carpet Thrill MAY 11, 2016

  

  Haute Jewelry Is Hot MAY 11, 2016

  

  Cartier, Bulgari and Others Shun a Top Jewelry Showcase MAY 11, 2016

  Ruth Chapman, co-founder of MatchesFashion.com, wrote in an email: “She makes beautiful, wearable, modern jewelry in fabulous colors which appeal to collectors and more aspirational customers alike. The femininity and delicacy of her work give her global appeal.”

  

  Ms. Neuwirth opened her store at the end of 2014. “It was something I’ve always dreamt of, taking control of my branding and how people perceive my jewelry,” she said. “I felt really confident after being in business for 10 years that it wouldn’t be a fail, and that it would be a growing tool.”

  

  The 2,000-square-foot space — which Ms. Neuwirth designed in collaboration with Pam Shamshiri, who was with the Los Angeles design collective Commune at the time — has a feminine feel, in pale greens and pinks with brass accents and ethnic textiles adding contrast.

  

  “I remember walking past a jewelry store on Rodeo Drive a few years ago, and seeing guys outside on the sidewalk, wearing tuxedos and holding silver trays full of Champagne. It was so intimidating,” Ms. Neuwirth said. “That’s part of the traditional culture of fine jewelry I wanted to avoid.”

  

  At first, Ms. Shamshiri said, she was reticent about Ms. Neuwirth’s idea to put a kitchen in the store. “What about the smells?” she remembered thinking. “Then I went away a couple days and came back thinking, ‘She’s a genius.’ We went with a residential style for the whole place, and it makes the store feel like you are visiting Irene’s Paris apartment in L.A. She loves to entertain, is casual and intimate with people and in the way she wears jewelry, so it fits.”

  

  Like Ms. Neuwirth’s naturalistic creations of hand-carved opal flowers, labradorite leaves and rose cut moonstones, the store is a whimsical wonderland.

  

  The front walls are lined with animal portraits by the artist Claire Oswalt, including one of Teddy, the brand’s unofficial mascot. He is in the store most days, sitting at his owner’s feet as she lunches with friends or co-workers. And Ms. Neuwirth makes a modern twist on the cameo, using a pet’s photo to create a hand-painted charm, starting at $6,500. (Small gemstone pendants, which can be clustered on a chain, are the brand’s entry pieces, at about $400.)

  

  “I didn’t want jewelry to be the focus, but more of a discovery,” the designersaid of her vision for the space. Along another wall, Ms. Neuwirth’s sparklers are displayed in a magical diorama of flora and fauna crafted of cashmere, snakeskin and other organic materials by the artists Clare Crespo and Marine Panossian. Cabochon bracelets are draped across birds’ wings, and earrings dangle from vines. Other vitrines are filled with statement necklaces, such as a squash blossom-inspired piece that features an unusual mix of turquoise and ultrafine fire opals that would work as well with a T-shirt and jeans as with an evening gown.

  

  “All the rules in fine jewelry, I didn’t really know, so I don’t apply them,” Ms. Neuwirth said. “It’s that high low, precious, nonprecious mix. But I’m also very meticulous about how things are balanced and laid out. There is rhyme and reason.”

  

  The living room area is warm and inviting, with a plush pink velvet sofa and fireplace, a custom-made, brushed-silver hippo cocktail bar in the style of Lalanne, and bookshelves filled with stylish titles about the artist James Turrell and the photographer Richard Avedon. “It’s not unusual to have people come in, have a coffee, read or work on the pink couch,” Ms. Neuwirth said.

  

  And while the furniture and accessories are not for sale, “people try to buy them all the time.”

  

  In the kitchen, scalloped edges on custom cabinetry echo the shapes of Ms. Neuwirth’s rose gold teardrop earrings. Her modern take on the classic chandelier style was the bread and butter of her business early on, but now she says her biggest sellers are one-of-a-kind, $100,000-plus necklaces.

  

  A table with Gio Ponti chairs can seat 10, although Ms. Neuwirth pulls furniture out of the store so she can accommodate more guests for bigger parties. The Lacanche stove has been used by a number of L.A.’s top chefs, including Ludo Lefebvre (Trois Mec), Jon Shook and Vinny Dotolo (Animal) and Jessica Koslow (Sqirl), who cooked for a series of opening dinners last year. As the tequila flowed — Casa Dragones, the house favorite — no one jumped up and bought an opal necklace, but they did take off their shoes and dance, Ms. Neuwirth remembers.

  

  “I like the idea of creating brand awareness around everyday life, and not necessarily having to capitalize on it, but creating an image that in return helps sales of my jewelry,” she said.

  

  The actress Busy Philipps, a friend of Ms. Neuwirth’s, wrote in an email: “Anyone who has been to her store or followed her on Instagram or even just been in a room with Irene for five minutes wants to know how to emulate her style and her life.”

  

  Noting that she has built entire red carpet looks around Ms. Neuwirth’s one-of-a-kind pieces, Ms. Philipps added: “She does travel to fabulous places and she throws incredible parties, but there’s no pretense about it. She always surrounds herself with great friends ... and she incorporates great food and lots of color. Flowers everywhere, perfectly mismatched dishware, beautifully embroidered napkins she picked up in Mexico or wherever.”

  

  In October, Ms. Neuwirth invited 140 of her friends to her 40th birthday celebration in the colorful Mexican town of San Miguel de Allende. She rented the lavish Casa Hyder, the colonial-style estate with over-the-top lush decor, and planned every detail of the weekend’s festivities, from organizing a Day of the Dead parade through the town square, complete with strolling servers with shots of Casa Dragones, to hand-tying hundreds of paper flowers so they would fall just so from the top of the garden tent where dinner was served.

  

  Although she opted out of having media coverage of the event, which was attended by Ms. Philipps, Ms. Banks and a several other Hollywood types, she garnered publicity anyway, as she and her guests documented their experience in the small town on social media. “Not so much in sales, but I saw it translate into awareness in an unintentional way,” Ms. Neuwirth said.

  

  Ms. Neuwirth spent her childhood between Bel Air in Los Angeles, where her businessman father, Peter Neuwirth, lived, and the bohemian Venice canals, where her artist mother, Geraldine Neuwirth, made her home — and where the designer now lives with her boyfriend, the film director Phil Lord.

  

  After college, she retreated to Malibu to ride horses and figure out what she wanted to do with her life. She started experimenting with jewelry, stringing glass beads, and sent a few pieces unsolicited to Barneys New York. The store picked them up and she had a business.

  

  This summer, Ms. Neuwirth will take her entertaining skills to London, where Mr. Lord will be filming “Han Solo,” a “Star Wars” franchise spinoff, and she has rented a townhouse in Notting Hill.

  

  Expanding her international business will be a priority. “I don’t have a big plan like I have to be a $200 million brand next year,” she said. “I just want to continue on the path of becoming a forever brand.”

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Женские рубашки зимы 2017 года. Без женских рубашек сейчас немыслимы рабочие отношения. Они подчеркивают стиль в одежде и помогают быть оригинальными. Женский костюм, брюки или юбка начинаются с рубашки.
Инаугурация президента Дональда Трампа. Как оделись Дональд Трамп, Мелания и Иванка Трамп. Наряды которые украсили торжества в день инаугурации, и подчеркнули выбор Америки на ближайшие четыре года. Всё это и торжественная речь президента будет говорить о важности моды в Америке.
Зимний отдых. Пятизвездочный бутик-отель Raffl’s St. Antoner Hof. Зимний отдых состоит не только из катания на лыжах или сноуборде, это также прекрасная возможность провести время в компании родных и близких, наслаждаясь при этом прекрасными снежными видами на горы.
Королевские каникулы в январе. В этом месяце великолепно проводить отдых не на жарком пляже, а именно на территории зимы – занимаясь спортом, наслаждаясь свежим воздухом и прекрасными пейзажами, а по вечерам, в приятной компании, перед горящим камином, согреваться глинтвейном.
Ротенбург-на-Таубере — «спящий город» из волшебной сказки. В Ротенбург на Таубере стоит поехать хотя бы только затем, чтобы погулять по узким мощеным улочкам, поймать капельку волшебства в местных лавочках, вдохнуть аромат расслабленности и умиротворения.
Салаты с красной икрой, как это вкусно! Салаты с красной икрой - радость то ради чего стоит жить. Держите всегда под рукой хорошее шампанское, несколько рецептов салатов с красной икрой...
Как украсить дом к Новому году 2017 Приближается Новый год, и впереди приятная, но непростая задача - украсить свой дом, создав ощущение настоящего праздника.
Компьютер для роскоши. Компьютеры меняют жизнь. Они же позволяют использовать все достижения технологий. Хотелось бы поговорить о компьютере за пределом брендов. Которые все же делают продукцию на среднего потребителя.
Шампанское Moët & Chandon, Brut "Imperial". 
Коллекция Louis Vuitton - КРУИЗ 2017.  Новая коллекция была показана в Музее современного искусства в Нитерое (Бразилия). Она, традиционно уже, была представлена художественным директором Louis Vuitton Николя Жескьером.
Costume National Fall/Winter 2016-2017. Sensual, dark-toned and overwhelmed with fancy heroin-chic vibes, Ennio Capasa’s Costume National fall/winter 2016-17 ready-to-wear collection gave Milan Fashion Week a more sophisticated and mysterious twist.
Erin Fetherston Осень-Зима 2017-2018.
Коллекция американского дизайнера Эрин Фезерстон (Erin Fetherston).
Pamella Roland Осень-Зима 2017-2018.
Это современная готика в мире одежды, выходящая за рамки жизни на один день.
Lacoste на показах New York 2017.
Lacoste показала моделей одетых в одежду, которая хорошо подойдет автомеханикам.
Женские рубашки зимы 2017 года.
Без женских рубашек сейчас немыслимы рабочие отношения. Они подчеркивают стиль...
Зимний отдых. Пятизвездочный бутик-отель Raffl’s St. Antoner Hof.
Активный отдых зимой улучшает здоровье.
Королевские каникулы в январе.
В этом месяце великолепно проводить отдых не на жарком пляже, а именно на территории зимы.
Ротенбург-на-Таубере — «спящий город» из волшебной сказки.
В Ротенбург стоит поехать чтобы погулять по узким мощеным улочкам.
Салаты с красной икрой, как это вкусно!
Держите всегда под рукой хорошее шампанское и несколько рецептов салатов с красной икрой.
Как украсить дом к Новому году 2017
Приближается Новый год, и впереди приятная, но непростая задача - украсить свой дом...
Компьютер для роскоши.
Хотелось бы поговорить о компьютере за пределом брендов.
Шампанское Moët & Chandon, Brut "Imperial".
Напиток сделавший успех многих значимым.
Коллекция Louis Vuitton - КРУИЗ 2017.
Новая коллекция была показана в Музее современного искусства в Нитерое (Бразилия).
Costume National Fall/Winter 2016-2017.
Sensual, dark-toned and overwhelmed with fancy heroin-chic vibes, Ennio Capasa’s Costume National
Персоны.
Джуд Лоу в Esquire.


Джуд Лоу человек из поколения артистов и деятелей шоу бизнеса делавших девяностые годы, в том числе и в нулевые, и после 2010-го - они тоже делали 90-е. Их жизнь и творчество, как дорога прошедшая через жизнь поколения.

Два ярких образа Виктории Бекхэм за один день.


Виктория Бекхэм оказалась в тренде весны. Эта стильная красавица частый гость вечеринок и светской хроники, показала желание быть похожей на миллионершу.

Кейт Мосс снялась обнаженной для W Magazine.


Глянец W Magazine отметился новой фотосессией, 43-летняя топ-модель Кейт Мосс снялась голой для мартовского номера. Вместе с ней журнал украсили модельер Донателла Версаче.

Миранда Керр, Кендалл Дженнер и другие на вечеринке Harper's BAZAAR.


У именитого журнала о моде, стиле и обществе Harper's Bazaar, в этом году юбилей. Издание пользующееся заслуженной популярностью отмечает 150 лет.

Звезды на вечеринке The Luxury Health Day


2 июня 2016 года в ресторане «Река» состоялся The Luxury Health Day. Эксклюзивное мероприятие, посвященное здоровому образу жизни, было организовано по инициативе TheLuxuryNetwork.

Кейт Бланшетт стала послом доброй воли ООН по делам беженцев.


Актриса Кейт Бланшетт вступила в должность посла доброй воли ООН по делам беженцев после гуманитарной поездки в Иорданию.

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